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Memory Metals Shape the Evolution of Aviation

Shape-memory alloy (SMA) is a functional metal with unique properties that allow it to be trained to move on its own. Researchers at NASA Glenn partnered with Boeing to test how shape-memory alloys can be used in deployable vortex generators (VGs), the tiny fins you might have noticed on airplane wings that help control airflow during flight.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense, Materials, Metals
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System Prevents Speedy Drones from Crashing

MIT researchers developed a trajectory-planning model that helps drones fly at high speeds through previously unexplored areas, while staying safe. The model — named “FASTER” — estimates the quickest possible path from a starting point to a destination point across all areas the drone can and can’t see, with no regard for safety.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Defense
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“Circulatory” Air Conditioning Could Keep Planes Cooler

The complex network of veins that keeps us cool during the heat of summer has inspired engineers to create novel thermal management systems. A new computer program could be key to mimicking the body’s evolution-optimized cooling system in functional materials.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Composites, Materials
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New Navigation System Enables Critical Assured PNT in Contested Environments

Collins Aerospace Systems, a unit of United Technologies Corp., has been selected by the U.S. Army to provide a next-generation Mounted Assured Positioning, Navigation and Timing System (MAPS) for manned ground vehicles. Known as ‘MAPS Gen II’ by the Army, the system will maintain the integrity of positioning and timing during operations in GPS-contested environments. Collins Aerospace will deliver new systems to be evaluated for a year with the potential for fielding up to 8,000 additional vehicles upon completion.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Motion Control, Positioning Equipment, Transportation
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Preparing for the Consequences of a Chemical Attack

Is the U.S. ready for a chemical attack on the homeland? With the very real possibility of a chemical attack in public spaces like stadiums, religious buildings, museums and theaters, or even contamination of the food or water supply, the U.S. needs to be prepared to take appropriate action to save lives. This means having security measures in place to prevent or minimize the attack. It also means having effective medical responses that consider the quantity of medical supplies needed, transportation of those supplies to the scene, and medical facilities and personnel to care for the injured.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Mathematical/Scientific Software, Simulation Software, Software
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Armoring Satellites to Survive and Operate Through Attacks

Satellites do a lot of things — they help people navigate from one place to another, they deliver television programming, they search for new stars and exo-planets and they enable the U.S. nuclear deterrence strategy. But until recently, one thing they haven’t done — or needed to do — is defend themselves. That may soon change.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aerospace, Defense, Lasers & Laser Systems, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics
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Improving Flight One Breath at a Time

NASA’s Pilot Breathing Assessment (PBA) program documents how pilots breathe in fighter aircraft while flying a variety of scripted profiles to better understand how flight conditions may cause pilots to experience a physiological episode during flight.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aeronautics, Aviation, Defense
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Composite Metal Foam Outperforms Aluminum for Aircraft Wings

The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics. New research shows that a combination of steel composite metal foam (CMF) and epoxy resin has more desirable characteristics for use as a leading-edge material than the aluminum currently in widespread use.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Composites, Materials, Metals
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NASA’s Supersonic X-59 QueSST Being Built at Famed Factory

In the high desert of California, where some of the most important aircraft in aviation history have been built and flown, the next airplane destined to make history continues to take shape on a legendary factory floor. That airplane is NASA’s X-59 QueSST (short for Quiet SuperSonic Technology), an experimental piloted aircraft designed to fly faster than sound without producing sonic booms.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aerospace Manufacturing and Machining, Defense
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Cracking in Harsh Environments Needs Both Stress and Corrosion

Alloys (metals combining two or more metallic elements) are typically stronger and less susceptible to cracking than pure metals. Yet when alloys are subjected to stress and a harsh chemical environment, the alloy can fail.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aerospace Manufacturing and Machining, Defense
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Porsche and Boeing Partner on Urban Air Mobility

Porsche and Boeing have partnered to leverage their unique market strengths to study the future of premium personal urban air mobility vehicles.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense
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NASA and Industry Electrify Commercial Aviation

NASA and U.S. industry are exploring electrified aircraft propulsion as a fuel- and- cost-efficient alternative to traditional jet engine-powered airplanes. But to make electric commercial flight possible, the aircraft must be able to produce and operate safely with at least a megawatt (MW) of power.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Propulsion
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AUSA 2019: A Really Cool Computer

Ben Sharfi, CEO of General Micro Systems (GMS), says he has the Product of the Year. Do you agree?
Posted in: News, Blog, Data Acquisition, Defense, Board-Level Electronics, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Thermal Management
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AUSA 2019: Eyes in the Sky

It just wouldn’t be a military technology show without a few drones on display.
Posted in: News, Blog, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Batteries, Antennas, Sensors
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AUSA 2019: Military Preps for Open Sensor Standards

SOSA, the Sensor Open Systems Architecture Consortium, held a press conference on Monday afternoon at AUSA 2019.
Posted in: News, Blog, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Communications, Defense, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics & Computers, Antennas, RF & Microwave Electronics, Sensors
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AUSA 2019: A View From the Show Floor

Editor Bruce A. Bennett offers a look at the Association of the United States Army's 2019 Annual Meeting.
Posted in: News, Blog, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense, Robotics, Automotive, Transportation
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Answering Your Questions: How Will the Military Use Motion Control Technology?

A Tech Briefs reader asks: What's next with military motion control?
Posted in: News, Blog, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense, Mechanical Components, MEMs, Motion Control, Motors & Drives, Positioning Equipment, Automation, Robotics
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Army Hopes to Use AI to Create More-Efficient Fuel Cells

As part of an effort to address the gap the U.S. Army faces in its need for long-lasting power and batteries for warfighters, an Army-funded research team has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that officials say identifies a promising material for creating more-efficient fuel cells. Researchers said the system, developed at Cornell University, is a potential breakthrough in both materials science and machine learning. It relies on a collective of algorithmic bots, each performing a distinct task and sifting through hundreds to thousands of combinations of elements to create a map of phases—arrangements of atoms in relation to each other—that humans can then use to determine which might work as a new material.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Materials, Power, Simulation Software, Software
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How to Dismantle a Nuclear Bomb

How do weapons inspectors verify that a nuclear bomb has been dismantled? An unsettling answer is: They don’t, for the most part. When countries sign arms reduction pacts, they do not typically grant inspectors complete access to their nuclear technologies, for fear of giving away military secrets.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Inspection Equipment, Instrumentation, Measuring Instruments, Monitoring, Test & Measurement, Testing Procedures
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Air Force Scientists Discover Unique Stretchable Conductor

The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed liquid metal systems which autonomously change structure so that they become better conductors in response to strain. Conductive materials change their properties as they are strained or stretched. Typically, electrical conductivity decreases and resistance increases with stretching.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Electronics, Materials
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