Tech Briefs

AFRL experts investigate airfield pavements at Langley Air Force Base.

AFRL engineers used prototypes of recently developed ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electronic cone penetrometer (ECP) devices to determine whether voids and anomalies in a particular airfield's subsoil were facilitating crack formation in an aircraft runway. Using the data collected during their Langley Air Force Base (AFB), Virginia, investigation, they were able both to determine the extent (and, in some cases, the cause) of the subsoil deterioration and to provide several recommendations for repairing abnormal or weakened portions of the runway. This field investigation also provided valuable information about the AFRL-developed prototype inspection devices; the evaluation results will aid designers in further refining these developmental products.

Scientists, engineers, and technicians assigned to AFRL's Airbase Technologies Division develop technologies involved in rapidly assessing the condition of existing airfields and creating or repairing airfield operating surfaces. As an outgrowth of their technology development efforts, they also provide the Air Force civil engineering community with innovative and affordable technical assistance that enhances the capability to react to timecritical problems. When civil engineers from Langley AFB identified potential problems on the base airfield surface, AFRL engineers were able to respond with two prototype evaluation technologies. The AFRL team examined selected airfield pavements at Langley for subsoil voids and other anomalies, such as weakened underlying material. The Langley engineers were particularly interested in assessing the pavement surrounding a storm drainpipe. The AFRL team's comprehensive assessment included visual inspection of the airfield pavement, data gathering from local sources, GPR scans (including both grid pattern and focused), coring and ECP testing, and data analysis and reporting.

ImageScientists, engineers, and technicians assigned to AFRL's Airbase Technologies Division develop technologies involved in rapidly assessing the condition of existing airfields and creating or repairing airfield operating surfaces. As an outgrowth of their technology development efforts, they also provide the Air Force civil engineering community with innovative and affordable technical assistance that enhances the capability to react to timecritical problems. When civil engineers from Langley AFB identified potential problems on the base airfield surface, AFRL engineers were able to respond with two prototype evaluation technologies. The AFRL team examined selected airfield pavements at Langley for subsoil voids and other anomalies, such as weakened underlying material. The Langley engineers were particularly interested in assessing the pavement surrounding a storm drainpipe. The AFRL team's comprehensive assessment included visual inspection of the airfield pavement, data gathering from local sources, GPR scans (including both grid pattern and focused), coring and ECP testing, and data analysis and reporting.