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The simplistic definition of UAV reads like this:

“An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), colloquially known as a drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot on board. Its flight is controlled either autonomously by computers in the vehicle, or under the remote control of a pilot on the ground or in another vehicle.”

With the advent of more sensitive electronic equipment in the mid ‘90s, the use of UPS devices became more widespread.
While accurate, this definition does not adequately convey the technological sophistication of the UAV or its importance in the theater of war.

The Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security and U.S. intelligence agencies are increasingly using UAVs for everything from battlefield surveillance to remote-controlled strikes against terrorists. And it isn't just the United States that has shown such dramatic interest in these aircraft. An article in the May 6, 2013 edition of The Guardian notes that the British military has amassed at least 500 drones as part of an ambitious plan whereby a third of the Royal Air Force will consist of remotely piloted aircraft by the year 2030.

As noted above, these a maz ing devices are controlled and monitored through a variety of methods; however, the most prevalent are the sophisticated UAV ground control stations that can either be located in the immediate vicinity of the UAV’s mission or thousands of miles away from where the aircraft is flying. A typical UAV ground control station has two consoles – one for the aircraft operator and one for the payload operator, working in tandem. Utilizing the skills of each operator, in combination with the sophistication of the control station's technology, the UAV can achieve significant military objectives without endangering live military personnel.

Of course, despite its technological intricacy, the UAV ground control station requires something that even the most primitive electrical device requires – power. For the stations established at United States military bases, a reliable electrical supply generally presents no problem. Conversely, in the foreign battlefield areas where many of the ground control stations are deployed, a dependable electric grid is a rarity. To begin with, in the more remote areas of the world, there may be no electrical grid at all. And even where there is a grid, the unreliability (due to constant outages, surges, and other fluctuations) precludes their use, given the critical nature of the typical military UAV mission, which requires 100% up-time.

Consequently, the military has had to turn to alternative energy sources to power these ground control stations. This has primarily meant the use of diesel-fueled generators — not surprising, given their availability and low cost to produce AC or DC power. Additionally, diesel fuel is readily available in large supplies virtually everywhere in the world.

The Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security and U.S. intelligence agencies are increasingly using UAVs for everything from battlefield surveillance to remote-controlled strikes against terrorists.
As with most military applications, UAV ground control stations use two generators in an A/B switchover mode (a redundancy system like N+1). In the event of a failure by generator A, the secondary generator B comes online.

While generators have become more reliable over the years, some issues remain. Today’s primary con cern is the downtime during the switchover from generator A to B. This results in a system that, for some period of time, however limited, is without power. As a result, the UAV can, in effect, be "flying blind."

A significant issue with generators is the ongoing downtime needed to regularly refuel and check other fluid levels as well as routine maintenance. In the case of a soldier who forgets, or is unable to refuel a generator due to combat conditions, the generator could shut down. This could cause the UAV to lose power and also go down. While a scheduled and, therefore, controlled shutdown can reduce lag time, even those few seconds can be critical, depending on the UAV's mission and the situation in which it is being deployed.