Sensors

Putting Smart Weapons to The Test

In the old days, a slingshot, BB gun, rifle or cannon was only as smart as the marksman taking aim. Now, many weapons are guided to their targets with the precision of infrared sensors and lasers. The technology continues to advance, but testing technology has lagged behind, leaving new generations of weapons and their tactical advantages unavailable to today's troops.

Posted in: News, Defense, Detectors, Sensors, Test & Measurement
Read More >>

Initial Validation of Ballistic Shock Accelerometers

A Test Operations Procedure (TOP) describing methods and instrumentation used in the initial validation of accelerometers to be used in both Ballistic Shock testing and crew/vehicle survivability Live Fire Test and Evaluation (LFT&E).

Method 522.2 of MIL-STD-810G CN1 defines ballistic shock as “a high-level shock that generally results from the impact of projectiles or ordnance on armored combat vehicles”. Typical engagements of interest also include Kinetic Energy projectiles, land mines, and improvised explosive devices. For the purposes of this TOP, ballistic shock is generally referred to as the sudden high-rate loading resulting from under body blast (UBB) testing designed to assess the crew-survivability of military vehicles. Historical testing conducted in both areas have proven the relative similarities between the two environments.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace, Sensors
Read More >>

Experimental Box Could Track Nuclear Activity by Rogue Nations

Researchers at the Virginia Tech College of Science are carrying out a research project at Dominion Power’s North Anna Nuclear Generating Station in Virginia that could lead to a new turning point in how the United Nations tracks rogue nations that seek nuclear power. The years-long project centers on a high-tech box full of luminescent plastic cubes stacked atop one another that can be placed just outside a nuclear reactor operated by, say, Iran. The box would detect subatomic particles known as neutrinos produced by the reactor, which can be used to track the amount of plutonium produced in the reactor core.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Defense, Electronics & Computers, Detectors, Sensors
Read More >>

Secure 3D Printing: 'Three-Layer' System Protects Parts from Hackers

A 3D printer is essentially a small embedded computer — and can be exploited like one.

Researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and Rutgers University have developed a “three-layer” way of certifying that an additively manufactured part has not been compromised.

Posted in: News, News, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Detectors, Sensors
Read More >>

Researchers Achieve Breakthrough in Nuclear Threat Detection Science

Taking inspiration from an unusual source, a Sandia National Laboratories team has dramatically improved the science of scintillators — objects that detect nuclear threats. According to the team, using organic glass scintillators could soon make it even harder to smuggle nuclear materials through America’s ports and borders.

Posted in: News, Defense, Materials, Detectors
Read More >>

Eye Tracking Technology Improves Imposter Detection Training

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) screens nearly one million people every day and secures and manages 328 ports of entry all over the country, including in remote areas. Verifying the identity of every single person entering the United States is a vital step in halting human trafficking, drug trafficking, and other smuggling attempts at the border. In addition, security screening prevents criminals and terrorists from entering the country. Imposter detection crosscuts the entire Homeland Security Enterprise, as well as state, local, and tribal law enforcement and even front-line soldiers in our military. All of these frontline operators execute this task as part of their respective missions and they must be able to accurately and efficiently verify identification of individuals to thwart imposters.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Defense, Machine Vision, Visualization Software, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors, Electronics & Computers, Software
Read More >>

Local Situational Awareness Design and Military and Machine Vision Standards

Real-time video is playing an increasingly important role in a range of military local situational analysis (LSA) applications to help improve surveillance and intelligence of possible threats while keeping troops out of harm’s way.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Defense, Imaging, Data Acquisition, Sensors
Read More >>

Determining Detection and Classification Potential of Munitions Using Advanced EMI Sensors in the Underwater Environment

Electromagnetic induction could be used to locate and characterize potentially dangerous sunken metallic objects.

Hazardous ordnance items are present along coastlines and in rivers and lakes in waters shallow enough to cause concerns for human recreational and industrial activities. The presence of water makes it difficult to detect and remove these hazardous legacies induced from wars, military training and deliberate disposal. Various techniques have been proposed to detect and characterize Unexploded Ordnances (UXO) and discarded military munitions (DMM) in the underwater environment including acoustic waves, magnetometery, and electromagnetic induction (EMI).

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, TSP, Aerospace, Sensors, Sensors and actuators, Sensors and actuators, Water, Defense industry, Conductivity, Hazardous materials, Marine vehicles and equipment, Missiles
Read More >>

Lightweight Artificial Hair Sensors Could Enable “Fly by Feel”

The Air Force Research Laboratory was inspired by the hairs on bats and crickets in creation of artificial hair sensors that could assess the external environment and change maneuvers during flight. The need to understand ambient air data and its effects on aircraft performance, navigation, and more has become more critical as aircraft are now lighter and operate in diverse environments.

Posted in: News, Defense, Sensors
Read More >>

Creating the Future: A Better Way to Map Terrain

Mark Skoog, an aerospace engineer at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center, led the development of new software that stores terrain data in a more efficient and accurate way. The achievement, Skoog says, opens the prospect of anyone – yes, anyone – being able to fly.

Posted in: News, News, Aerospace, Imaging, Sensors
Read More >>