MEMs

Pulsed Microwave Plasma Instrumentation for Investigation of Plasma-Tuned Multiphase Combustion

Strategies to control solid rocket propellant regression rate require a robust throttling technique applicable to high performance propellant formulations. Currently, several methods to control and throttle either motors or subscale propellant strands exist, including chamber pressure control (e.g. pintle nozzles or rapid depressurization quench), infrared laser irradiation of the burning surface to increase burning rates, development of inherently unstable combustion chamber geometries (producing either local pressure or velocity perturbations), and electrically sensitive hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN)-based formulations in which burning rate is controlled by a voltage potential. However, these techniques are limited in that they either can only be used with low flame temperature (low specific impulse) propellants, result in low propulsion system mass fraction (pintle), are only capable of producing a single perturbation, or are formulation specific.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace
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Synthetic Aperture Radar for Helicopter Landing in Degraded Visual Environments

The development of sensors to assist helicopter landing in degraded visual environments (DVEs) is currently an important US Army requirement addressing the Survivability of Future Vertical Lift Platforms program, one of the Army's modernization priorities.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace
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Novel Characterization Methods for Anisotropic and Mixed-Conduction Materials

State-of-the-art electronic and optoelectronic devices require electronic materials with specialized properties that cannot be characterized with standard methods, or that must be characterized with extra precision. As a result of this research, the following new materials characterization methods have been developed:

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace
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Boeing, ELG Carbon Fibre Find New Life for Airplane Structure Material

Boeing and ELG Carbon Fibre recently announced a partnership to recycle excess aerospace-grade composite material, which will be used by other companies to make products such as electronic accessories and automotive equipment. The agreement – the first of its kind for the aerospace industry – covers excess carbon fiber from 11 Boeing airplane manufacturing sites and will reduce solid waste by more than one million pounds a year.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense
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Customizing Computer-Aided Design

MIT researchers have devised a technique that “reverse engineers” complex 3-D computer-aided design (CAD) models, making them far easier for users to customize for manufacturing and 3-D printing applications.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense
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Northrop Grumman and Airbus Partner on “Wing of Tomorrow” Program

Northrop Grumman Corporation recently finalized a Cooperation and Research Agreement to work closely with Airbus on the Wing of Tomorrow program. The three-year agreement expands the current Northrop Grumman relationship with Airbus and explores complex composite wing stiffener forming automation with out-of-autoclave material systems through an investment in equipment, test articles and engineering support.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense
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Cartilage-Like Material Enables Structural Battery

A structural battery prototype incorporates a cartilage-like material to make the batteries highly durable and easy to shape. The idea behind structural batteries is to store energy in structural components like the wing of a drone.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Power
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Study Could Help Aircraft Avoid Dynamic Stall

University of Illinois researchers are studying the physics of dynamic stall so that it can be used beneficially and reliably by aircraft. The problem has been studied at low speeds but at higher speeds, the process becomes significantly disorganized and difficult to understand.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Simulation Software
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NIF Experiments Support Warhead Life Extension

It was a normal morning for design physicist Madison Martin at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). At 7:45 a.m., she settled into her classified workstation with a cup of tea to check the results of a numerical calculation she ran overnight. If the calculations proved correct, the experiment she was designing on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) would deliver the data her colleagues needed to verify that a refurbished nuclear warhead would perform as expected.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Data Acquisition, Defense, Materials, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors
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Discovery Could Lead to Munitions That Go Further, Much Faster

Researchers from the U.S. Army and top universities discovered a new way to get more energy out of energetic materials containing aluminum, common in battlefield systems, by igniting aluminum micron powders coated with graphene oxide. This discovery coincides with the one of the Army's modernization priorities: Long Range Precision Fires. This research could lead to enhanced energetic performance of metal powders as propellant/explosive ingredients in the Army's munitions.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Alternative Fuels, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage, Materials, Propulsion
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