Materials

Discovery Could Lead to Munitions That Go Further, Much Faster

Researchers from the U.S. Army and top universities discovered a new way to get more energy out of energetic materials containing aluminum, common in battlefield systems, by igniting aluminum micron powders coated with graphene oxide. This discovery coincides with the one of the Army's modernization priorities: Long Range Precision Fires. This research could lead to enhanced energetic performance of metal powders as propellant/explosive ingredients in the Army's munitions.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Alternative Fuels, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage, Materials, Propulsion
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Porous and Stiff Material for Aircraft Lightweighting

Researchers have developed and manufactured a family of architectures that maximizes the stiffness of porous, lightweight materials. 3D printing and other additive production techniques make it possible to manufacture materials with internal structures of previously unimaginable complexity. Achieving this requires that the internal structures be intelligently organized for maximum efficiency.

The stiffness in the material’s interior is achieved through plate-lattices rather than trusses. These structures that are up to three times stiffer than truss-lattices of the same weight and volume.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Composites, Materials
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Metal Additive Manufacturing

Additive manufacturing (AM) – the process of building up solid layers of material to form a finished solid part — is an emerging and exciting technical discipline. Also referred to as “3D printing,” many misconceptions exist about the capabilities and promises of the technology.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, 3 D Printing & Additive Manufacturing, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Materials, Metals, Plastics, Machinery, Mechanical Components
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Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

Reinforcing polymers with strong/stiff fibers is nothing new. Such materials have been used pretty much since aircraft were first created. In those pioneering days, wings were reinforced with woven cotton, or silk fabric skins, impregnated with nitrocellulose ‘dope’ to seal against the wind, and laminated wood was reinforced with fabric bonded with adhesive. Although there have been a myriad of developments along the way from those early days to where we are now in the 21st century, the principles of reinforcement are much the same.

Posted in: Articles, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense, Thermal Management, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Composites, Materials, Metals, Plastics
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Lightweighting Parts Using 3D Metal Printing

Metal additive manufacturing (3D printing), also known as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Powder Bed Fusion (PBF), is changing the way metal parts are designed and produced. New software, processes and materials are redefining manufacturing value equations for specific types of parts, which can lead to improvements on existing products, new business models and new markets.

Posted in: Articles, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense, 3 D Printing & Additive Manufacturing, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Metals, Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE), Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM), Simulation Software, Software
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Optimizing Plasma Treatments to RESOLVE Challenging Adhesion Issues

The process of determining the ideal plasma treatment that will resolve a challenging bonding or adhesion issue is an exact science, often the domain of chemists and physicists.

Posted in: Articles, Defense, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Materials, Plastics, Fastening, Joining & Assembly, Instrumentation, Measuring Instruments, Monitoring, Test & Measurement
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Does Your Coating System Require Climate Control? What to Look For and What to Expect

There is one aspect of the paint and coatings finishing business virtually guaranteed to give the budget director heart failure: climate control. There's no way around it – climate control systems are expensive.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Automotive, Defense, Thermal Management, Coatings & Adhesives, Machinery, Mechanical Components, Automotive
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Producing Manufacturing Aids with HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printing

In the era of mass production and lean manufacturing, companies are looking for ways to help boost productivity and reduce unit costs while maintaining quality and repeatability. The focus is on continuously improving production techniques, accelerating the various phases within the Product Lifecycle while keeping costs at a minimum. Manufacturing aids such as jigs, fixtures, quality control aids, dies and punches and dummy parts play a critical role here.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, White Papers, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Coatings & Adhesives, Automation, Robotics
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Army, ASU Collaboration Produces Alloy with Superhero-Like Strength

Researchers from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and Arizona State University (ASU) have designed a super-strong alloy of copper and tantalum that can withstand extreme impact and temperature. It's likely the closest material on earth to vibranium, a rare, fictitious metallic substance found in Marvel's Wakanda and used in Captain America's shield.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Defense, Materials, Metals, Nanotechnology
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2018 Create the Future Design Contest: Aerospace & Defense Category Winner

DETECTING PLASTIC LANDMINES

Hidden PFM-1 anti-personnel landmines are unexploded ordnance (UXO) devices that pose a difficult challenge to conventional landmine detection methods like metal detecting because the mines are primarily composed of plastic and only weigh 75 g. As a remnant of the Soviet-Afghan War, there are an estimated 10 million such devices scattered throughout Afghanistan. These mines remain in isolated locations, frequently out of reach of de-mining nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and act to thwart local economic and social development. The PFM-1s are infamously referred to as “toy mines,” as children often mistake the mines for toys and set off the 525 kg of cumulative pressure it takes to detonate them.

Posted in: News, Articles, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Batteries, Power Management, Power Supplies, Green Design & Manufacturing, Imaging, Composites, Materials, Metals, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors, Software
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