Materials

New Products & Services: December 2017 Aerospace Manufacturing & Fabrication

Metric-Sized Metal Shapes

Parker Steel Company (Maumee, OH) offers metric-sized metals suitable for applications where presized metric parts are needed. Parker Steel’s cold-finished carbon steel, alloyed and high-strength stainless steel, aluminum, copper, brass and tool steel bars/shafting, tubing, sheets and plates, angles, channels and tees; and other specialty shapes can be shipped out the same day as ordered with very few exceptions.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials, Metals, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors, Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Simulation Software, Software, Measuring Instruments, Monitoring, Test & Measurement
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Using Thermoplastic Composites for Aerospace Applications

Recent advancements in composite production and processing are making thermoplastics a viable option in a wider array of aerospace applications.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Composites, Materials
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Improving the Surface Finish of Additive Manufactured Parts

South West Metal Finishing has been working on an additive manufacturing surface treatment process for the last three years and believes it could be the future choice of aircraft manufacturers around the world, such as the likes of Safran, UTC Aerospace and Airbus.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Defense, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Coatings & Adhesives
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Technique Predicts Early Warning Signs of Structure’s “Wellness”

Researchers from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have shown that early fatigue damage behavior in structures may be predicted through the study of the microscale mechanical behavior of the material. By understanding the behavior of the material prior to damage, it could lead to vehicle structures that act as sensors themselves, with the ability to report their health state and adapt to varying conditions.

Posted in: News, Defense, Materials
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Rare Material Could Shorten Air Travel Times

An average flight from Miami to Seattle takes about six hours and 40 minutes, but imagine being able to reduce that time to 50 minutes or less. A recent study by NASA and Binghamton University researchers focuses on boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs).

Posted in: News, Defense, Composites, Materials
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Shaping Aviation: Metal with Memory

Through NASA’s Convergent Aeronautics Solutions (CAS) Project, a team of engineers working within its Spanwise Adaptive Wing (SAW) project is investigating the feasibility of bending or shaping portions of an aircraft’s wings in-flight, potentially increasing performance and efficiency by reducing weight and drag.

Posted in: News, Aviation, Defense, Composites, Materials, Metals
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Strong and Stretchable “Super Steel”

In aerospace applications of materials, increasing strength often leads to a decrease in ductility. Engineers have developed a Super Steel that addresses this strength-ductility tradeoff. In addition to the substantial improvement of tensile properties, the steel has low raw-material cost and simple industrial processing.

Posted in: News, Defense, Materials, Metals
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Energized Fabrics Could Keep Soldiers Warm in Frigid Climates

Soldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and cause overheating and sweating upon exertion. And hands and feet can grow numb despite wearing such gear. To keep military personnel more comfortable and battle-ready in bitterly cold climes, scientists are conducting research aimed at creating high-tech fabrics that heat up when powered and capture sweat.

Posted in: News, Defense, Composites
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Researchers Print the Unprintable: Kapton

Kapton, a material used in electronics and aerospace applications, has only been available in sheet form. Researchers from Virginia Tech have found a way to 3D-print a polymer with Kapton's structural characteristics.

Posted in: News, News, Aerospace, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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Optical Method Detects Weak Spots in Jet Engine Coatings

Researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, that an optical analysis method can reveal weak areas in ceramic thermal barrier coatings that protect jet engine turbines from high temperatures and wear. The technique could be used to predict how long coatings would last on an airplane. The lifetime of a thermal barrier coating used on airplane turbine blades can range from as little as 1,000 hours up to 10,000 hours at full turbine thrust, even when the coating is applied in the exact same way.

Posted in: News, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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