Materials

Second Vendor F-35 Canopy Testing Completed

Testers from the Holloman High Speed Test Track, in conjunction with members of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office, Lockheed Martin, Martin Baker, and BAE Systems, successfully conducted an F-35 static ejection seat test to evaluate pilot survivability using a canopy transparency from a new manufacturer. The purpose of this test was to demonstrate that the ejection seat is able to penetrate through the canopy without severely injuring the pilot if there is ever a failure with the Transparency Removal System (TRS); TRS is a charge designed to fracture the cockpit canopy acrylic prior to ejection.

Posted in: INSIDER, Aerospace, Defense, Design, Product Development, Coating/Surface Modification, Materials
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NASA Develops Unique Materials for Next Generation Aircraft

As NASA looks to the future of flight, the agency is investing in technologies aimed at changing the aviation industry as we know it. These developments vary from basic materials to full-scale experimental aircraft, all designed to increase efficiency and reliability, while decreasing weight and cost.

Posted in: INSIDER, Aerospace Manufacturing and Machining, Aerospace, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Ceramics, Composites, Materials
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Quantum Effect Triggers Unusual Material Expansion

You know how you leave space in a water bottle before you pop it in the freezer—to accommodate the fact that water expands as it freezes? Most metal parts in airplanes face the opposite problem. At high altitudes (low temperatures) they shrink. To keep such shrinkage from causing major disasters, engineers make airplanes out of composites or alloys, mixing materials that have opposite expansion properties to balance one another out.

Posted in: INSIDER, Aerospace Manufacturing and Machining, Aerospace, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Metals
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Limiting Creep in Aerospace Materials

Creep is an especially important consideration for engineers designing jet engine turbines.
Posted in: Articles, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage, Materials, Machinery, Mechanical Components, Power, Power Transmission, Propulsion
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Deformation Sensing in Soft Bio-Surrogate Materials

Accurate measurement of deformations occurring within or on soft materials will advance the next class of soft robotics and wearable biomedical sensors.
Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace, Data Acquisition, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Energy, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Materials, Mechanical Components, Robotics, Biosensors, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors, Digital Health, Health Monitors and Activity Trackers, Wearables
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Wearable Device Camouflages Its Wearer Regardless of the Weather

Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed a wearable technology that can hide its wearer from heat-detecting sensors such as night vision goggles, even when the ambient temperature changes. It's a feat that current state of the art technology cannot match. The new technology can adapt to temperature changes in just a few minutes, while keeping the wearer comfortable.

Posted in: INSIDER, Defense, Coating/Surface Modification, Materials, Photonics, Digital Health, Health Monitors and Activity Trackers, Wearables
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Machine Learning Accelerates High-Performance Materials Development

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and its partners rely on timely development and deployment of diverse materials to support a variety of national security missions. However, materials development and deployment can take many years from initial discovery of a new material to deployment at scale.

Posted in: INSIDER, Defense, Materials
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NRL Researchers’ Golden Touch Enhances Quantum Technology

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory discovered a new platform for quantum technologies by suspending two-dimensional (2-D) crystals over pores in a slab of gold. This new approach may help develop new materials for secure communication and sensing technologies based on the unique laws of physics at the atomic levels.

Posted in: INSIDER, Defense, Materials, Metals
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Researchers Develop Innovative Tools to Accelerate Composites Certification

In partnership with industry, a team of Air Force Research Laboratory/Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) personnel are developing the capability to accelerate certification of advanced manufactured composite structures. Creating a new materials characterization sub-facility, known as the Materials Solutions Network, will drive composite manufacturing into a physics-based exact science that can be predicted and modeled in ways impossible until now, allowing faster implementation of low-cost, short-term and limited-life technologies.

Posted in: INSIDER, Defense, Composites, Materials, Plastics
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Understanding Condensation Leads to Better De-icing Materials

Water repellency is needed for surfaces to shed condensation buildup. New research by the University of Illinois and North Carolina State University shows that the necessity of water repellency is unclear and that the slipperiness between the droplets and solid surface appears to be more critical to the clearing of condensation.

Posted in: INSIDER, Defense, Coating/Surface Modification, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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