Sharks on a Plane? Skin Scales Lift Aircraft Design

To improve a flying vehicle, sometimes you have to turn to a reliable model that has been operating for hundreds of millions of years.

Posted in: News, Blog, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense, Imaging, Visualization Software, 3 D Printing & Additive Manufacturing, Materials, Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM), Mathematical/Scientific Software, Simulation Software, Software

New Products: February 2018 Aerospace & Defense Technology

Rugged Servers with Skylake Architecture

Themis Computer® (Fremont, CA) announced the launch of its next generation XR6 Rugged Enterprise Servers (RES) featuring the newest Intel® Xeon® Scalable (Skylake) Processors.

Posted in: Products, Aeronautics, Aviation, Data Acquisition, Defense, Board-Level Electronics, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Power Supplies, Cameras, Imaging, Fastening, Joining & Assembly, Machinery, Mechanical Components

New Invention Could Lead to Novel Terahertz Light Sources

A new device could open new avenues for the generation of high-frequency radiation with applications in science, radar, communications, security and medical imaging.

Posted in: News, Defense, Energy, Imaging


The newest crash test dummy in development is actually a blast test dummy. WIAMan (Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin) is a ground-breaking anthropomorphic test device (ATD) being developed by the U.S. Army. It’s the first test dummy designed specifically for vertical loading in under-body blast (UBB) scenarios, like the ones soldiers may experience in combat from IEDs. A key goal of the program is to develop a scientifically-valid injury criteria for blast testing of military ground vehicles. This test data will be the most advanced of its kind and will be used to develop new, safer vehicles and associated equipment to help reduce injury risk for warfighters. Another first coming out of this program is the high-tech data acquisition system that is entirely contained within the dummy, making it the first completely autonomous device of its kind.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Defense, Imaging, Sensors, Anthropometric test devices, Protective structures, Military vehicles and equipment

NASA, Boeing Test Synthetic Vision

NASA and Boeing are working together under a new Space Act Agreement to improve flight training and aviation safety using NASA’s synthetic vision technologies and Boeing’s 787 simulators. Synthetic vision technologies are essentially weather-immune displays that allow pilots to see what the world looks like in perfect weather conditions all the time.

Posted in: News, Defense, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging

Flight Deck “Ouija Boards” Go Digital

To make the jobs of aircraft handlers easier, the Navy developed the Deployable Ship Integration Multi-touch System (DSIMS), a mobile software package that features a digital touchscreen image of a ship’s flight deck or hangar bay, and can be used on a laptop or desktop computer. It replaces the “Ouija board” replica of the flight deck.

Posted in: News, Defense, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging

Eye Tracking Technology Improves Imposter Detection Training

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) screens nearly one million people every day and secures and manages 328 ports of entry all over the country, including in remote areas. Verifying the identity of every single person entering the United States is a vital step in halting human trafficking, drug trafficking, and other smuggling attempts at the border. In addition, security screening prevents criminals and terrorists from entering the country. Imposter detection crosscuts the entire Homeland Security Enterprise, as well as state, local, and tribal law enforcement and even front-line soldiers in our military. All of these frontline operators execute this task as part of their respective missions and they must be able to accurately and efficiently verify identification of individuals to thwart imposters.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Defense, Machine Vision, Visualization Software, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors, Electronics & Computers, Software

Robot’s Speed-of-Light Communication Could Protect You From Danger

Cornell University researchers are developing a system to enable teams of robots to share information as they move around, and if necessary, interpret what they see. This would allow the robots to conduct surveillance as a single entity with many eyes. Beyond surveillance, the new technology could enable teams of robots to relieve humans of dangerous jobs such as disposing of landmines, cleaning up after a nuclear meltdown or surveying the damage after a flood or hurricane. The project, called “Convolutional-Features Analysis and Control for Mobile Visual Scene Perception,” is supported by a four-year, $1.7 million grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

Posted in: News, Defense, Machine Vision, Visualization Software, Optics, Robotics

Local Situational Awareness Design and Military and Machine Vision Standards

Real-time video is playing an increasingly important role in a range of military local situational analysis (LSA) applications to help improve surveillance and intelligence of possible threats while keeping troops out of harm’s way.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Defense, Imaging, Data Acquisition, Sensors

Imaging Detonations of Explosives

An effort has been made within the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) to extract quantitative information on explosive performance from high-speed imaging of explosions. Explosive fireball surface temperatures are measured using imaging pyrometry (2-color 2-camera imaging pyrometer; full-color single-camera imaging pyrometer). Framing cameras are synchronized with pulsed laser illumination to measure fireball/shock expansion velocities, enabling calculation of peak air-shock pressures. Multicamera filtering at different wavelengths enables visualization of light emission by some reactant species participating in energy release during an explosion. Measurement of incident and reflected shock velocities is used to calculate shock energy on a target.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace, Imaging, Imaging, Thermodynamics, Defense industry, Missiles