News

Lab Research Mimics Blast-Induced Brain Trauma in Soldiers

Researchers have developed a procedure to mimic in laboratory experiments a form of brain trauma commonly seen in combat veterans, and findings suggest a new diagnostic tool for early detection and a potential treatment.

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Sandia Works on Nuclear Weapon Life Extension Program

Sandia National Laboratories is doing what it hasn’t done in decades: extending the life of a nuclear warhead at the same time the U.S. Air Force develops a replacement cruise missile that will carry the weapon. The goal of the W80-4 Life Extension Program (LEP) is refurbishing the W80 warhead with replacement components for aging technology and components that have limited lifespans. Sandia’s California site is responsible for development of non- nuclear components and subsystems and for systems integration. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for the refurbishment of the nuclear explosive package and joint development of detonators with safety features.

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New Anechoic Chamber Makes Room for Larger Vehicle Tests

The Army recently increased its ability to test radio frequencies used by soldier technologies when it opened one of the largest anechoic chambers on the East Coast. The Radio-frequency Electro-Magnetic Compatibility and Antenna Test (REMCAT) laboratory provides additional testing space required for larger and mobile vehicle-mounted projects. This space allows the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) to test vehicles in a wide variety of radio frequency spectrum tests, allowing maximum function while maintaining accurate performance measurement.

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Disappearing Carbon Circuits on Graphene Could Have Security Uses

Using carbon atoms deposited on graphene with a focused electron beam process, Georgia Institute of Technology professor Andrei Fedorov and collaborators have demonstrated a technique for creating dynamic patterns on graphene surfaces. The patterns could be used to make reconfigurable electronic circuits, which evolve over a period of hours before ultimately disappearing into a new electronic state of the graphene. Graphene is also made up of carbon atoms, but in a highly-ordered form.

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Remote-Controlled Weapons Augment Soldiers on Perimeter Security

Remotely-controlled weapons systems have drastically reduced the number of soldiers needed for perimeter security at an expeditionary base camp.

"Every Soldier I have assigned to securing the perimeter is one I don't have that can execute support missions," said Lt. Col. Raphael Heflin, commander, 142nd Combat Service Support Battalion, or CSSB, 1st Armored Division.

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Army Tests Improved Multiple Launch Rocket System

Over 100 artillery rockets were launched recently at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) to test an improved version of the M270A1 Multiple Launch Rocket System, or MLRS. The test, conducted at WSMR's G-16 impact area, saw an M270A1 MLRS vehicle equipped with a new armored cab fire 138 rockets to ensure the improvements didn't negatively impact the vehicles' mission performance.

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3D Printed Aircraft Flown Off Royal Navy Warship

A 3D printed aircraft has successfully launched off the front of a Royal Navy warship and landed safely on a Dorset beach.

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Vibration Table Used to Test Nuclear Weapon Components

It took decades for technology to catch up with the math David Smallwood worked out to control vibration table shakers. Smallwood, a retired Sandia National Laboratories researcher who consults at the labs, knew that shaking in all directions at once was the key to realistic parts testing. Now Sandia is putting the algorithms he developed more than 30 years ago to the test by shaking up nuclear weapon components.

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Army Develops Technology to Intercept Drones

As drone technology gains greater public attention, along with its potential for hostile action against American targets, Army engineers are adapting ongoing research to counter aerial systems that could threaten soldiers. At Picatinny Arsenal, the Extended Area Protection and Survivability Integrated Demonstration (EAPS ID) began as an Army Technology Objective program. The goal was to develop and demonstrate technology, which could support a gun- based solution to counter rockets, artillery and mortars (C-RAM). Research into enhanced C-RAM technology had the goal of extending the range and probability of success against the incoming threat.

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Researchers Embed Sensors Inside 3-D Printed Parts

In an effort to better monitor the structural health of military equipment, Picatinny Arsenal and engineers from the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) Lakehurst have recently teamed up to embed 3-D printed metal parts with internal sensors.

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