News

Technique Enables 3D Printing of Aerospace-Grade Carbon Fiber Composites

Researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have become the first to 3D print aerospace-grade carbon fiber composites, representing a significant advance in the development of micro-extrusion 3D printing techniques for carbon fiber.

Posted in: News, Defense, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling
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NASA Test Flights Will Study Improved Efficiency of Supersonic Aircraft

NASA is set to begin a series of supersonic flights that will examine efforts to improve the efficiency of future supersonic aircraft. Future supersonic aircraft seeking to achieve a low boom will rely on a swept wing design in order to fly at supersonic speeds without producing a loud sonic boom. The swept wing design generally produces airflow disturbances that run along the span of the wing, resulting in turbulent flow, increased drag, and ultimately, higher fuel consumption.

Posted in: News, Aviation, Defense
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Language Learning Robot Could Advance Autonomous Vehicles

A Purdue University researcher and his team are developing technology to give robots the ability to learn language. A team led by Jeffrey Mark Siskind, associate professor in Purdue’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has developed three algorithms that allow a wheeled robot to learn the meanings of words from example sentences that describe example paths taken by the robot, to use the words to generate a sentence to describe a path of movement, and to comprehend the sentence in order to produce a new path of movement.

Posted in: News, Defense, Robotics, Simulation Software, Software
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Researchers Study Ceramic Material as Possible Lightweight Vehicle Armor

The U.S. Army Research Lab (ARL) and Australian Defence Science and Technology Group are collaborating to study ceramic materials for potential use in the design of military vehicle armor using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s High Flux Isotope Reactor.

Posted in: News, Defense, Ceramics, Materials
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US, Japan Conduct First SM-3 Block IIA Intercept Test

Engineers from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, in cooperation with the U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA), the Japan Ministry of Defense, and U.S. Navy sailors aboard USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53), played a key role in the first live-fire intercept using the new Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IIA guided missile during a recent flight test off the west coast of Hawaii. This test marks the first time an SM-3 Block IIA was launched from an Aegis ship and the first intercept engagement using the Aegis Baseline (B/L) 9.C2 (BMD 5.1) weapon system.

Posted in: News, Aeronautics, Defense
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Next-Generation Batteries Could Power Microsatellites

NASA's Kennedy Space Center and the University of Miami are developing a new solid-state battery prototype that could revolutionize the way NASA operates microsatellites such as CubeSats. Rather than placing a battery in the experiment, taking up 20 to 35 percent of the available volume, the battery now resides in the payload structure, thereby opening up additional free space for researchers to perform more science.

Posted in: News, Defense
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Polymer Material Decreases Mass of Aircraft

Lomonosov Moscow State University engineers created unique polymer matrices for polymer composites based on novel phthalonitrile monomers. The materials can sufficiently decrease the mass of aircraft parts that operate at high temperatures. The high-temperature polymer composites can replace existing metal engine parts.

Posted in: News, Defense
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New Lab Helps Boeing Detect Aircraft Flaws

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology and The Boeing Company established a new nondestructive evaluation (NDE) laboratory that uses millimeter-wave technology to improve the detection of potential flaws in coatings, surfaces, and materials.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense, Instrumentation
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Fluctuating Forces of Flight Captured by High-Tech Paint

A rocket is buffeted by a chaotic flow of air during flight. At high speeds, airplanes experience a similar, unsteady flow of air over their wings. A method to precisely measure these fluctuating forces uses pressure-sensitive paint (PSP), called Unsteady PSP, which emits a bright crimson glow in the presence of high-pressure airflow.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense
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Discovery Could Lead to Cleaner, More Efficient Jet Engines

Researchers at The Ohio State University found a way to improve the high-temperature properties of superalloys used in jet engines. The method tailors an alloy’s composition and exposes it to high heat and pressure to prevent microscopic defects from forming, actually making the alloy stronger. This “phase transformation strengthening” eliminates the formation of defects and decreases alloy deformation by half. When an engine can run at very high temperatures, it consumes its fuel more thoroughly and produces lower emissions.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense
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