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Multi-Scale Analysis of Deformation and Failure in Polycrystalline Titanium Alloys Under High Strain Rates

Extensive use of titanium alloys in critical industrial and military applications, such as compressor blades of jet engines and armor of ground combat vehicles, has motivated researchers to understand, measure and tailor the mechanical properties of these alloys over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. Of special interest has been the mechanical response of these alloys under high rates of deformation and failure under cyclic/dwell fatigue.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace, Defense, Materials, Aircraft structures, Body panels, Failure modes and effects analysis, Materials properties, Titanium alloys, Military vehicles and equipment
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Abrasion Testing of Products Containing Nanomaterials

This SOP describes how to detect and quantify the release of nanoparticles from surface coatings into the air using a mechanical process that employs abrasion to simulate sanding. A material containing nanoparticles will be physically abraded and the materials released will be collected in a custom abrasion testing system. They will then be characterized by different methods such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and other methods.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace, Defense, Materials, Microscopy, Nanomaterials, Wear, Test procedures
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Spectrum Fatigue of 7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy Under Overloading and Underloading

Most structural members and machine components are subjected in service to cyclic loadings of varying amplitude. The variation in stress level follows either a regular or random pattern. The resulting crack growth is affected by the applied load sequence in the early stage (crack initiation) and in the later stage (crack propagation) of fatigue. The fatigue crack growth is known to be retarded by tensile overloads and accelerated by compressive overloads (underloads). However, the phenomenon and mechanism of the load sequence effects, especially those of overloading and underloading, on fatigue crack growth in different environments remain to be clarified.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace, Defense, Materials, Failure modes and effects analysis, Aluminum alloys, Fatigue
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New Web-Based Software Enables Quick Drone Design

A Utah State University aerospace engineer is offering the public a free software tool that could revolutionize the drone industry. Doug Hunsaker, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at USU, is offering a 3D online software program that generates aerodynamic information about a user’s aircraft design.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense, Computer-Aided Design (CAD)
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New Ice-Repellant Material Could Improve Aviation Safety

Icy conditions can be deadly when flying into bad weather. Researchers at the University of Houston have discovered a material that can be applied to any surface to repel ice. The material, known as a magnetic slippery surface (MAGSS), could be applied to aircraft wings.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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Aircraft Arrival Technology Will Reduce Flight Delays

Flight Deck Interval Management (FIM) promises to safely increase the number of airplanes that can land on the same runway at busy airports by more precisely managing the time, or interval, between each aircraft arrival.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense, Simulation Software, Software
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T-rays Will “Speed Up” Computer Memory By a Factor of 1,000

Together with their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands, scientists at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have found a way to significantly improve computer performance. They propose the use of so-called T-waves – or terahertz radiation – as a means of resetting computer memory cells. This process is several thousand times faster than magnetic-field-induced switching.

Posted in: News, News, Board-Level Electronics, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers
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First Stryker Vehicle Prototype With 30mm Cannon Delivered to Army

The first prototype Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle, outfitted with a 30mm cannon, has been delivered to the U.S. Army. The upgraded Stryker vehicle will be known as the Dragoon, the name of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment. The prototype also features a new fully-integrated commander's station, upgraded driveline componentry and hull modifications, according to a press release from Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems.

Posted in: News, Defense, Automotive, Transportation
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‘Nano-Kebab’ Fabric Breaks Down Chemical Warfare Agents

Researchers have created a fabric material containing nanoscale fibers that are capable of degrading chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Uniform coatings of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized on top of the nanofibers, forming unique kebab-like structures. These MOFs are what break down the CWAs, rendering them harmless.

Posted in: News, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Materials
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Fragment Tracking Gives Insights Into What Happens In Explosions

A bang and a swirl of dust from detonating 9 pounds of plastic explosive in the desert signaled the beginning of tests that — thanks to advances in high-speed cameras, imaging techniques and computer modeling — will help Sandia National Laboratories researchers study fragmenting explosives in ways that weren’t possible before.

Posted in: News, Defense, Cameras, Imaging, Visualization Software
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