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Analytical Methods Help Develop Antidotes for Cyanide, Mustard Gas

To develop antidotes for chemical agents, such as cyanide and mustard gas, scientists need analytical methods that track not only the level of exposure but also how the drug counteracts the effects of the chemical. That's where the work of Erica Manandhar, postdoctoral research associate at South Dakota State University, comes in.

Posted in: News, Defense
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Army Aviators Test Next Generation Air-to-Ground Missile

Aviation testers have been busy testing the latest Army aviation missile, known as the Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM). The complex JAGM test was a collaborative team effort between the West Fort Hood, Texas-based Aviation Test Directorate of the U.S. Army Operational Test Command, Yuma Test Center at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, and Redstone Test Center based at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Posted in: News, Defense
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New Vehicle Technology May Protect Troops from Blast-Induced Brain Injury

Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and the University of Maryland's A. James Clark School of Engineering have developed a new military vehicle shock absorbing device that may protect troops from traumatic brain injury (TBI) after a land mine blast. Over the past 18 years of conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 250,000 troops have suffered such injuries. Prior to this study, most research in this area focused on the effects of rapid changes in barometric pressure, also known as overpressure. "This is the only research so far to model the effects of under-vehicle blasts on the occupants," said Dr. Gary Fiskum. "We have produced new insights into the causes of TBI experienced by vehicle occupants, even in the absence of significant pressure changes." The research has led to the development of materials and vehicle frame design that greatly reduce injury caused by under-vehicle explosions. Dr. Fiskum and Dr. William Fourney, PhD, Associate Dean of the Clark School, Keystone Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Dynamic Effects Laboratory, were the first to demonstrate how the enormous acceleration (G-force) that occupants of vehicles experience during under-vehicle blasts can cause mild to moderate TBI even under conditions where other vital organs are unscathed.

Posted in: News, Defense
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Origami is Key to Air Force Concepts

For scientists and engineers at the Air Force Research Laboratory, the prospect of using origami to create complex, multi-functional materials from a two-dimensional substrate is a highly attractive concept, with the potential to deliver engineering solutions and new applications for the Air Force.

Posted in: News, INSIDER, Defense
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Blockage Detection System Could Prevent Aircraft Accidents

Acoustic methods have been used for detecting blockages in pipes for many years. Researchers set out to discover if similar methods could be used for real aircraft Pitot tubes, which can contain irregular shapes and passages, without needing a very complicated detection method.

Posted in: News, INSIDER, Defense
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Ultrafine Fibers Could Revolutionize Body Armor

Researchers at MIT have developed a process, called gel electrospinning, that can produce ultrafine fibers - whose diameter is measured in nanometers, or billionths of a meter - that are exceptionally strong and tough. These fibers, which should be inexpensive and easy to produce, could be choice materials for many applications, such as protective armor and nanocomposites.

Posted in: News, Defense
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Printing on Patrol

What if our military could dramatically reduce the amount of materials and equipment held on the front lines by printing only what they need? Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are aiming to do this with new advances in 3-D printing.

Posted in: News, Defense
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Army Trains Robots to "Learn" From Humans

Researchers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and The University of Texas at Austin have developed new techniques for robots or computer programs to learn how to perform tasks by interacting with a human instructor.

Posted in: News, Defense
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Sharks on a Plane? Skin Scales Lift Aircraft Design

To improve a flying vehicle, sometimes you have to turn to a reliable model that has been operating for hundreds of millions of years.

Posted in: News, Blog, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense, Imaging, Visualization Software, 3 D Printing & Additive Manufacturing, Materials, Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM), Mathematical/Scientific Software, Simulation Software, Software
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Natural DNA-Based Nonvolatile Resistive Switching Memory

Motivated by the demand for an even larger storage capacity in the information era, research efforts have been devoted to the development of more efficient and cost-effective memory elements.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace, Neural networks, Switches, Data management
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