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Nanotube Yarns Generate Electricity When Stretched

Scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and South Korea’s Hanyang University have developed tiny, high-tech yarns that generate electricity when stretched or twisted. The nanoyarns, constructed from hollow carbon nanotubes, create current when coated with an ionically conducting material — even a simple mixture of table salt and water.

Posted in: News, News, Energy, Energy Harvesting
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Secure 3D Printing: 'Three-Layer' System Protects Parts from Hackers

A 3D printer is essentially a small embedded computer — and can be exploited like one.

Researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and Rutgers University have developed a “three-layer” way of certifying that an additively manufactured part has not been compromised.

Posted in: News, News, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Detectors, Sensors
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Optical Method Detects Weak Spots in Jet Engine Coatings

Researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, that an optical analysis method can reveal weak areas in ceramic thermal barrier coatings that protect jet engine turbines from high temperatures and wear. The technique could be used to predict how long coatings would last on an airplane. The lifetime of a thermal barrier coating used on airplane turbine blades can range from as little as 1,000 hours up to 10,000 hours at full turbine thrust, even when the coating is applied in the exact same way.

Posted in: News, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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NASA Tests Could Lead to FAA Integration of UAVs

NASA’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System, or UAS in the NAS, project is attracting international attention as increasingly complex flight tests take place over NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. The project is designed to develop recommendations for the FAA to safely open the skies to allow UAS to fly in the same airspace with human-piloted aircraft.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense
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Airborne Sense-and-Avoid Radar for UAVs

Widespread use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) within the National Airspace System is limited because of regulatory restrictions on their access to shared airspace. The Airborne Sense and Avoid (ABSAA) Radar Panel, a phased array antenna developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory, has the potential to facilitate the introduction of UAVs into the national airspace.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Aviation, Data Acquisition, Defense, Electronics & Computers, Automation
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New Form of Carbon Is Hard as a Rock, But Elastic Like Rubber

A team of scientists has developed a form of ultra-strong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique combination of properties could serve a wide variety of applications from aerospace engineering to military armor.

Posted in: News, Defense, Composites, Materials
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Researchers Test Minuteman III Intercontinental Ballistic Missile

As an unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) rocketed into the night sky, a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers listened intently to radio chatter and watched flight data stream in from a control room at the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site. It was the first of two flight tests conducted recently to verify that the system could deliver a payload to target.

Posted in: News, Defense, Test & Measurement
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Army Discovers New Energy Source

Army scientists and engineers recently made a groundbreaking discovery – an aluminum nanomaterial they designed produces high amounts of energy when it comes in contact with water, or with any liquid containing water.

Posted in: News, Defense, Materials
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Rising Temps Could Limit Aircraft Takeoffs

Rising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study by Columbia University. As air warms, it spreads out, and its density declines. In thinner air, wings generate less lift as a plane takes off. Depending on aircraft model, runway length, and other factors, at some point, a packed plane may be unable to take off safely if the temperature gets too high.

Posted in: News, Aeronautics, Aviation, Defense, Propulsion, Transportation
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Towed Airborne Plume Simulator

Arnold Engineering Development Complex
Arnold Air Force Base, TN
931-454-5655
For more info click here

A team of engineers at AEDC are supporting the continued development and testing of the Towed Airborne Plume Simulator (TAPS), a simulator that can be towed behind aircraft for testing missile warning and infrared countermeasure systems. Most recently the AEDC TAPS team assisted the Air Force Research Laboratory with a mission in Australia.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Aerospace, Defense, Simulation and modeling, Exhaust emissions, Aircraft operations, Test equipment and instrumentation
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