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New Class of Excimer-Pumped Atomic Lasers (XPALS)

Research demonstrates the viability of an atomic laser having a quantum efficiency greater than one.

The focus of this research program was the investigation of XPAL properties, and new pumping schemes, as well as modeling, and measuring critical photoionization and excited state-excited state reaction rates in order to improve the performance of XPALs.

Posted in: Briefs, Aerospace
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Using Heat Pipes to Cool Embedded Computers

Heat pipes are a well-known thermal management solution used in computing applications. Nearly all laptop computers contain some number of heat pipes to effectively remove heat from heat generating components like the CPU and GPU.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace
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500 Gallon LOX Trailers

Essex Industries, Inc.
St. Louis, MO
314-832-4500
www.essexindustries.com

Essex Industries recently received an order from the United States Air Force for 500 Gallon LOX Trailers. Shipment of the 32 trailers was scheduled to begin in August and run through February of 2018. The USAF will deploy most of these units at domestic bases, as well as US bases in Oman, Japan, South Korea and Italy.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Defense
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Developing an Airborne Optical Systems Testbed (AOSTB)

The United States shares 5,525 miles of land border with Canada, and 1,989 miles with Mexico. Monitoring these borders, which is the responsibility of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), is an enormous task. Detecting and responding to illegal activity while facilitating lawful commerce and travel is made more difficult by the expansive, rugged, diverse, and thickly vegetated geography that spans both often-crossed borders. To help mitigate the challenges to border surveillance, a group of researchers at MIT Lincoln Laboratory is investigating whether an airborne ladar system capable of imaging objects under a canopy of foliage could aid in the maintenance of border security by remotely detecting illegal activities.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace
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Electronically Dimmable Aircraft Windows

How do you block the light of the sun?

That was the challenge posed to Gentex by Boeing. Window shades typically do the job on an airplane, but they’re cumbersome to operate, expensive to maintain, and do little to reflect the hightech nature of today’s modern aircraft. They’re an analog technology holdover operating in the digital age.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace
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Nanotube Yarns Generate Electricity When Stretched

Scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and South Korea’s Hanyang University have developed tiny, high-tech yarns that generate electricity when stretched or twisted. The nanoyarns, constructed from hollow carbon nanotubes, create current when coated with an ionically conducting material — even a simple mixture of table salt and water.

Posted in: News, News, Energy, Energy Harvesting
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Secure 3D Printing: 'Three-Layer' System Protects Parts from Hackers

A 3D printer is essentially a small embedded computer — and can be exploited like one.

Researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and Rutgers University have developed a “three-layer” way of certifying that an additively manufactured part has not been compromised.

Posted in: News, News, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Detectors, Sensors
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Optical Method Detects Weak Spots in Jet Engine Coatings

Researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, that an optical analysis method can reveal weak areas in ceramic thermal barrier coatings that protect jet engine turbines from high temperatures and wear. The technique could be used to predict how long coatings would last on an airplane. The lifetime of a thermal barrier coating used on airplane turbine blades can range from as little as 1,000 hours up to 10,000 hours at full turbine thrust, even when the coating is applied in the exact same way.

Posted in: News, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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NASA Tests Could Lead to FAA Integration of UAVs

NASA’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System, or UAS in the NAS, project is attracting international attention as increasingly complex flight tests take place over NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. The project is designed to develop recommendations for the FAA to safely open the skies to allow UAS to fly in the same airspace with human-piloted aircraft.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Aviation, Defense
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Airborne Sense-and-Avoid Radar for UAVs

Widespread use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) within the National Airspace System is limited because of regulatory restrictions on their access to shared airspace. The Airborne Sense and Avoid (ABSAA) Radar Panel, a phased array antenna developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory, has the potential to facilitate the introduction of UAVs into the national airspace.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Aviation, Data Acquisition, Defense, Electronics & Computers, Automation
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