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Hardware Debug Software Adds 64-bit JTAG, Flash Support

Macraigor Systems LLC (Brookline, MA) has added JTAG debug and Flash memory programming support for several Freescale PowerPC and MIPS processor support, in addition to existing ARM microprocessor support to its OCDemon debug suite.

Full JTAG debug and Flash programming support has been added for the Freescale MPC5200 rev. B processor and the Freescale 83xx PowerQUICC II Pro family of processors. Flash programming capabilities also have been expanded to include the Freescale MPC5500 and MAC71xx families of processors, as well as MIPS 5Kc-based, 64-bit processors, including the Phillips PR1900, Toshiba TX49, and Broadcom BCM1250 and BCM1125 processors. The Flash programmer is supported under Windows 98/ME, NT, 2000, and XP operating systems, as well as under Red Hat Linux versions 7.2 and 9.0. The software may work with other operating systems and versions, but has not been verified against such and is not guaranteed to work.

Macraigor also has added support for these processors to its pre-built GNU tools suite, including sample configurations for standard evaluation boards. These examples contain source, gdbinit, and make files for each board. The included demo program allows developers to easily build, download, and debug a small application via gdb. Macraigor’s JTAG interface devices are immediately available for the ARM7, ARM9, ARM11, and Intel XScale processor families. Fully installable versions of the GNU toolkits for both Windows and Linux are immediately available. These include demo programs allowing the end-user to be up and running within minutes of the installation.

Also available is a version of OCDRemote, allowing users to use other versions of the GNU toolset with Macraigor’s hardware. GCC, the GNU Compiler Collection, includes front ends for C and C++ ARM compilers. The GNU Assembler, part of the GNU Tools software suite, is the assembler used to convert ARM assembly language source code into binary object files.

Other recent additions to OCDemon’s supported processor list include the AMCC PowerPC 440GP, 440EP, and 440GX processors. Macraigor has also updated their GNU tools suite to include example configurations for the AMCC Bamboo, Yosemite, Ebony, and Ocotea evaluation boards. Other recent additions include AMD Geode low-voltage NX processor and Freescale i.MX31 and i.MX31L multimedia application processors.

The OCDemon family of debug tools is immediately available for the listed processors and functions. OCD Commander, an assembly-level software debugger, and OCD Remote, the GNU tools suite, are available at no charge from the Macraigor Web site.

For Free Info Visit http://info.ims.ca/5655-404

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USB Digital I/O Board Enables High-Speed Digital Monitoring and Control

ACCES I/O Products (San Diego, CA) offers the Model USB-IIRO-16, featuring 16 Form C (SPDT) electromechanical relays and 16 optically isolated digital inputs. The board is designed to meet the needs of industrial systems monitoring and control. The industrial I/O market commonly uses electromechanical Form C relays due to their robustness and ability to withstand unexpected surge currents, allowing for increased flexibility in switching capability. These relays also are used where small reed relays are inadequate due to their susceptibility to contact damage.

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PLL/Synthesizer Includes VCO

Crystek Corporation’s (Fort Myers, FL) CPLL66 family is the company’s first foray into the PLL/Synthesizer market. Designed for digital radio equipment, fixed wireless access, satellite communications systems, base stations, personal communications systems, portable radios, and test instruments, the CPLL66 is a complete PLL/ Synthesizer that only needs an external frequency reference and supply voltages to operate the internal PLL (phase lock loop) and VCO (voltage controlled oscillator).

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Total In-Flight Simulator 50th Anniversary

AFRL’s Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS), a Convair C-131 Samaritan aircraft, entered service on March 22, 1955. The C-131 aircraft had performed various transport operations for approximately a decade up to that point, and the Air Force (AF) Flight Dynamics Laboratory—now AFRL— subsequently chose it for a very special mission: developing next-generation air vehicles.

Posted in: Briefs, Mechanical Components
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F-35 Antenna Measurement Program

Engineers are conducting sophisticated performance testing of F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) antennas at the AFRL Newport Research Facility, New York. Through an agreement with the F-35 Joint Program Office, engineers from Lockheed Martin and AFRL’s Rome Research Site are collaborating on the test effort. Because antenna testing is occurring early in the aircraft development cycle, the team is using a model—a full-scale F-35 replica—to measure the installed performance of the aircraft’s communications, navigation, identification, and electronic warfare antennas. The goal of this testing program is to optimize antenna performance and identify and correct antenna problems before the aircraft design is finalized and antenna system changes consequently become more difficult and expensive to incorporate.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers
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A New Method for Determining Aeroballistic Parameters From Flight Data

Dr. Gregg Abate, an AFRL exchange engineer, developed a new method for determining aeroballistic parameters from projectile flight data. Assigned to the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics (commonly known as the Ernst-Mach Institute), Freiburg, Germany, Dr. Abate was a participant in the AFRL-managed Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program, a Department of Defense effort to promote international cooperation in military research, development, and acquisition through the exchange of defense engineers and scientists.

Posted in: Briefs, Mechanical Components
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Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluid

An AFRL-developed fire-resistant hydraulic fluid recently completed a B-52 flight test, and based on successful test results, systems engineers from Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC) will adopt the fluid (MILPRF- 87527) for use in over 90% of the aircraft’s hydraulic systems. OC-ALC engineers will conduct further tests to determine whether they can also convert the hydraulic systems controlling the B-52’s landing gear and wingtip protection struts to the fire-resistant fluid. AFRL expects the improved fluid’s higher flash point and reduced flammability to increase the B-52 aircraft’s survivability and overall operational safety. Further, the fluid’s associated thermal stability measurements and fluid film thickness data indicate it performs well over extended periods of time in hightemperature environments and in temperatures as low as -65°F.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials
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Predicting the Composition of Metallic Glasses

AFRL scientists made significant progress in developing bulk metallic glasses to improve the durability and performance of aerospace components. They also successfully created working scientific models that can predict the composition of new metallic glasses, a capability that helps researchers determine in advance whether a particular glass can be manufactured in bulk form. As a direct result of their effort, researchers recently discovered several new bulk metallic glasses. Their work also led to the successful development of a new technique to illustrate the topology of amorphous (noncrystalline) metal alloys.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials
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Innovative Processes Strengthen F-15E Vertical Stabilizers

AFRL materials engineers resolved a potentially serious problem that affects the operational life of F-15E vertical stabilizers. Working with engineers from Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (WR-ALC), Georgia, they successfully developed, demonstrated, and transitioned an adhesive bonding process and nondestructive inspection (NDI) technique that ensure the stiffening doublers attached to both sides of the aircraft’s two vertical stabilizers remain adequately secured (see figure on next page). Successful transition of these innovative methods restores the operational life of the vertical stabilizers.

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