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RF Power Amplifiers Go Wide and High

The increasing demand for higher data rates in telecommunications and higher resolution in industrial systems is pushing the frequency of operation higher for the electronics that support them. Many of these systems operate over a wide frequency spectrum, and further increased bandwidth requirements are a common request for new designs. Across many of these systems there is a push to use one signal chain for all frequency bands.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, RF & Microwave Electronics
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Simulation Results Could Help Quiet Jet Noise

Argonne National Laboratory engineers are working to create high-fidelity computer simulations to determine how jet turbulence produces noise. Working on Argonne’s supercomputer Mira, the team is applying computational fluid dynamics to capture the physics of the turbulence that is making the noise.

Posted in: News, Defense, Electronics & Computers, Simulation Software
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NASA Tests Multi-Material 3D-Printed Rocket Engine Part

NASA engineers tested a 3D-printed rocket engine prototype part made of two different metal alloys via an advanced manufacturing process. The part was low-pressure, hot-fire-tested more than 30 times to demonstrate the functionality of the igniter.

Posted in: News, Defense, Test & Measurement
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Airline Industry Could Soar on Sugarcane Fuel

Plants Engineered to Replace Oil in Sugarcane and Sweet Sorghum (PETROSS), funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E), has developed sugarcane that produces oil, called lipidcane, that can be converted into biodiesel or jet fuel in place of sugar that is currently used for ethanol production. With 20% oil – the theoretical limit – all of the sugar in the plant would be replaced by oil.

Posted in: News, Defense, Alternative Fuels, Biomass, Renewable Energy
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6 Critical Errors to Avoid in Reusable Packaging Design

Designing a reusable, durable packaging solution for your product or service is much more than picking a type of package and a size. There are many things to consider about how your product will be used, where it will be used, and who will be using it. This list of six common errors will ensure your initial design decisions put you on the path to the most cost- effective case that combines the required protection with superior usability.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, White Papers, Defense, Electronics, Test & Measurement
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Sound-Off: With High-Speed Data, How Important is Signal Integrity?

Modern avionics are highly dependent on reliable connectivity — and reliable interconnection systems. As data rates inevitably improve to address greater military requirements, how will the increase impact signal integrity?

Posted in: News, News, Aviation, Data Acquisition, Defense
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Strong and Stretchable “Super Steel”

In aerospace applications of materials, increasing strength often leads to a decrease in ductility. Engineers have developed a Super Steel that addresses this strength-ductility tradeoff. In addition to the substantial improvement of tensile properties, the steel has low raw-material cost and simple industrial processing.

Posted in: News, Defense, Materials, Metals
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Air Traffic Management Tool Wins NASA Software of the Year

When planes get caught in traffic, pilots have to keep flying until the backup clears and their runways become available for landing. This means that air traffic controllers must send them on less-direct paths to their final destination, using more fuel in the process.

Posted in: News, Defense, Software
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Green Aerospace Test Uses No Explosives

Sandia National Laboratories has successfully demonstrated a new, more environmentally friendly method to test a rocket part to ensure its avionics can withstand the shock from stage separation during flight. The Alternative Pyroshock Test uses a nitrogen-powered gas gun to shoot a 100-pound steel projectile into a steel resonant beam, which then transfers energy through a resonant cone attached to the part being tested. The resulting energy transfer mimics the conditions of stage separation in space.

Posted in: News, Defense, Test & Measurement
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Army 3-D Prints a Building

The Construction Engineering Research Laboratory in Champaign, Illinois, has successfully three-dimensionally printed a 512 square-foot concrete structure. The structure, called a barracks hut or B-Hut, was printed as a result of a three-year Army Program called the "Automated Construction of Expeditionary Structures." It uses an additive manufacturing process to "print" semi-permanent structures in a theater of operation. The ability to use concrete sourced from readily available materials reduces logistical requirements for the U.S. Army.

Posted in: News, Defense, Green Design & Manufacturing, Manufacturing & Prototyping
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