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Simulation Software Improves Pilot Training

Simulation of a helicopter landing on a ship. (Chair of Helicopter Technology/TUM) Providing pilots with the best possible preparation for extreme situations is the goal of new simulation software. The program that combines flow mechanics and flight dynamics in real time. The numerical model is extremely flexible and does not depend on stored flow data. External conditions such as topography, global wind speeds, and aircraft type are input. During the simulation, the algorithms use that data to continuously compute the interacting flow field at the virtual aircraft’s current location.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Simulation Software

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Professor Simulates Bomb Blasts to Study How Things Break Apart

Left to right: Jefferson Wright and Helio Matos, who are earning their doctorates in mechanical engineering at URI, examine a pressurized water capsule with Arun Shukla. (Photo: Nora Lewis) How much force does it take to shatter a Humvee, a soldier’s body armor, or a submarine?

Posted in: News, Research Lab, Hazardous materials, Hazards and emergency operations, Injuries, Injury causation, Protective equipment, Protective structures, Protective systems, Test equipment and instrumentation

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High-Speed, Autonomous Surface Patrol Capability Demonstrated

A successful demonstration by Johns Hopkins APL and the Surface Targets Branch of the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division involved six surface target boats operating together at high speeds, using hardware and software that APL developed and integrated with the reliable boat control system created by the Surface Targets Branch. (Photo: U.S. Navy/JHUAPL) After a year of internal research and development, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, recently conducted a large, at-sea demonstration of swarming unmanned surface vessels (USV). The experiment — done in collaboration with the Surface Targets Branch of the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, Port Hueneme, California — was designed to advance the state of the art of collaborative, autonomous USV behaviors to higher speeds and a larger numbers of vessels.

Posted in: News, Robotics, Autonomous vehicles, Marine vehicles and equipment, Military vehicles and equipment

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Army Researchers Demonstrate 3-D Printed Drones

The 3-D printed On-Demand Small Unmanned Aircraft System, or ODSUAS, flies at speeds of up to 55 miles per hour. Although the lightweight shell and propeller arms are printed using additive manufacturing, the motors and propellers will be assembled using off-the-shelf equipment. (Photo: Angie DePuydt) Soldiers witnessed the innovation of Army researchers recently during flight testing of 3-D printed unmanned aircraft systems that were created on-demand for specific missions.

Posted in: News, Robotics, Military aircraft, Military vehicles and equipment, Unmanned aerial vehicles

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Computer Model More Accurately Predicts Flight Delays

Sina Khanmohammadi, a PhD candidate in systems science, leads a Binghamton University study that has developed a more accurate way of predicting airline flight delays. (Jonathan Cohen) Researchers at Binghamton University have devised a new computer model that can more accurately predict delays faster than anything currently in use. The multilevel input layer artificial neural network handles categorical variables with a simple structure to help airlines easily see the relationships between input variables (such as weather) and outputs (flight delays).

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Mathematical/Scientific Software

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Cockpit Display Shows Precise Locations of Sonic Booms

Flight Test Engineer Jacob Schaefer inspects the Cockpit Interactive Sonic Boom Display Avionics (CISBoomDA) from the cockpit of his F-18. (NASA Photo by Ken Ulbrich) NASA pilots flying supersonic aircraft now have a display that tells them exactly where sonic booms are hitting the ground. The display provided NASA research pilots the ability to physically see their sonic footprint on a map as the boom occurred. With the ability to observe the location of their aircraft’s sonic booms, pilots can better keep the loud percussive sounds from disturbing communities on the ground.

Posted in: News, Aeronautics, Aerospace

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Unique Method for Orifice Production

To produce accurate, repeatable orifices, all the variables that might influence the Cd Value (Coefficient of Discharge) must be controlled during production. This includes the orifice hole length, edges, surface finishes, roundness and the elimination of all tool marks, burrs, ragged edges and irregularities. If any one of these areas is not perfectly managed, the orifice flow rates will vary from piece to piece thereby making it impossible to predict flow with any accuracy.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Mechanical Components, Mechanics

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