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Automakers Use 3D Printing to Reap Benefits of Lower-Cost Tooling and More Efficient Assembly

3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has existed since the 1980s, but has recently been more widely adopted. In the span of a decade, 3D printers have moved from an optional piece of equipment for producing relatively simple prototypes, to an absolute necessity — one that is transforming the automotive industry in fundamental ways, This white paper highlights 3D printing applications in automotive today, and what’s coming tomorrow.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Automotive, Manufacturing & Prototyping

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New Web-Based Software Enables Quick Drone Design

Doug Hunsaker (right) has created a free, online 3D software for the design of safe and efficient small autonomous vehicles. A Utah State University aerospace engineer is offering the public a free software tool that could revolutionize the drone industry. Doug Hunsaker, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at USU, is offering a 3D online software program that generates aerodynamic information about a user’s aircraft design.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense, Computer-Aided Design (CAD)

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New Ice-Repellant Material Could Improve Aviation Safety

A drop of water rolls off the MAGSS ice-phobic surface. (Cullen College of Engineering) Icy conditions can be deadly when flying into bad weather. Researchers at the University of Houston have discovered a material that can be applied to any surface to repel ice. The material, known as a magnetic slippery surface (MAGSS), could be applied to aircraft wings.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Aircraft Arrival Technology Will Reduce Flight Delays

Retired airline pilots test procedures that will be used during upcoming flight tests of FIM. The simulator is set up like a Boeing 757 jet. (NASA Langley/David C. Bowman) Flight Deck Interval Management (FIM) promises to safely increase the number of airplanes that can land on the same runway at busy airports by more precisely managing the time, or interval, between each aircraft arrival.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Defense, Simulation Software, Software

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T-rays Will “Speed Up” Computer Memory By a Factor of 1,000

The figure shows the spin and lattice structure of thulium orthoferrite (TmFeO₃) on the left and the T-ray-induced transitions between the energy levels of thulium ions (Tm³⁺), which trigger coherent spin dynamics (memory switching), on the right. Together with their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands, scientists at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have found a way to significantly improve computer performance. They propose the use of so-called T-waves – or terahertz radiation – as a means of resetting computer memory cells. This process is several thousand times faster than magnetic-field-induced switching.

Posted in: News, News, Board-Level Electronics, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers

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First Stryker Vehicle Prototype With 30mm Cannon Delivered to Army

The first prototype Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle outfitted with a 30mm cannon was delivered Thursday to the Army. (Photo courtesy of Program Executive OfficeGround Combat Systems) The first prototype Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle, outfitted with a 30mm cannon, has been delivered to the U.S. Army. The upgraded Stryker vehicle will be known as the Dragoon, the name of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment. The prototype also features a new fully-integrated commander's station, upgraded driveline componentry and hull modifications, according to a press release from Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems.

Posted in: News, Defense, Automotive, Transportation

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‘Nano-Kebab’ Fabric Breaks Down Chemical Warfare Agents

Researchers deposited a thin film of titanium oxide onto a fabric made of nanoscale fibers using a vapor-phase technology called atomic layer deposition. Researchers have created a fabric material containing nanoscale fibers that are capable of degrading chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Uniform coatings of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized on top of the nanofibers, forming unique kebab-like structures. These MOFs are what break down the CWAs, rendering them harmless.

Posted in: News, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Materials

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